Tofu · vegan

Sundried tomato tofu soba

Tomatoey happy days

253 kcal  happyfacenobackground  happyfacenobackground  VE

 

Flavours: 1 tbsp tomato puree, ½ tsp mixed herbs, ½ tsp light soy sauce, 1 tsp lemon juice, ½ tsp sesame seeds

Bulk: 75g soba/buckwheat noodles, 200g block of firm tofu, 100g cucumber, 15g sundried tomatoes (in oil), 5 black olives, some cherry tomatoes

Jazzy: use yuzu juice instead of lemon juice in the sunomono and grill some halved cherry tomatoes

Lets cook: Start by making the sunomono/pickled cucumber. Thinly slice the cucumber, place in a bowl and sprinkle over some salt (this is to draw out the water) and set aside until later. Boil the soba noodles for around 4 minutes until just soft, drain and set aside. Meanwhile, cut the block of tofu in half if it is large, or if you have a small 100g block, leave be. In a covered pan, cover the tofu with hot water and boil for 10 minutes. Next move onto the tomato sauce by adding the tomato puree, 5 tbsp water, mixed herbs and finely chopped sundried tomatoes in a small cup/bowl. Microwave the sauce for around 1 minute, or until hot. By now, the cucumber should be ready to remove the excess water. Just grab some in your hands and squeeze out the water. Return to the bowl and mix in the lemon juice, soy sauce and sesame seeds. Portion out the soba noodles, sunomono and tofu. Pour the sauce mixture on top of the tofu and top with sliced olives. Grill some halved cherry tomatoes for a few minutes each side to finish this tomatoey meal off  cutefacenobackground

Sundried tomato tofu 1

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5 thoughts on “Sundried tomato tofu soba

  1. What a neat fusion of cuisines! I love your use of soba and tofu here. I often have soba with pesto, but I have yet to try it with tomato sauce. I’ll give this a go soon!

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      1. Ahhh, interesting! The really soft silken tofu, I do sometimes enjoy in the traditional Japanese style, topped with soy sauce and slices of green onion. But, I know what you mean with extra firm tofu! I always use it in Indian curries as a replacement for paneer, or crumbled in salads like feta.

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